Film or Digital?

Monday, April 18th 2016

I have always enjoyed taking photographs, and from a young age was encouraged to do so by my father.  A lesson soon learnt was how to put in the roll of film and how to take it out of the camera.  Prints went to the chemist for at least a week and slides went off in the post for longer.  The excitement of looking at the results was huge, as was the disappointment when that one and only shot was blurred.

When digital came along and computers associated with it, I fought hard.  No digital for me, ever!  I eventually, very reluctantly, accepted the loan of a digital camera - that was it.  I was, as they say, hooked.  Now I would not be without my camera around my neck.  I can take as many photos as I want and one amongst the many will be good to great!

I have taken photographs of most of the main flowers in Foxglove over the years.  This year I want to concentrate on the less well known ones and less obvious ones, which are often more difficult to take.  The first to show itself, in its usual place tucked along the boardwalk through the Scrapes is Ground Ivy.

Until hops were introduced into England in the 16th century, the leaves of Ground Ivy were used during brewing, hence its other name in parts of Yorkshire alehoof.

Ground Ivy

Some flowers react to the sun.  There is one Wood Anemone in flower.  Early in the morning it was closed.

Wood Anemone in the early morning

By mid-day it was open.  This one has already been chewed by snails or slugs.

Wood Anemone open by midday

As part of 'digitalisation' was the ease by which photos could be sent and received.  When you visit Foxglove, please bring your camera and take photographs and if you would like to share them with us please send them via email.  Our email address is foxglovelnr@btinternet.com.

Nest box cameras were another development in the digital progress.  Our Blue Tit still keeps coming into the box and sorting out her nest.  There is one piece of grass that is causing her a problem and she keeps having to move it around.

Lesser Redpolls were in large numbers in the back garden.  Siskin were also present as were a male and female Brambling.  Unfortunately they would not stay still long enough for a photo.

A Peacock Butterfly braved the cold wind and settled on a log, but by the time the camera was out and focused it was only the log to be seen, at least flowers and trees stay still!

One advantage of the wet weather is that footprints can be tracked in the mud.  Roe Deer were seen today and their steps, called slots, could be followed through the Hazel Avenue.

Roe Deer Footprints


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