Kittiwake Update

Monday, April 13th 2015

Last summer we were joined at Cape Wrath by a team from the RSPB as part of their Seabird Tracking and Research project. Their aim was to monitor the feeding behaviors of Kittiwakes along the coast of Scotland through the use of GPS trackers. Details of how this was done can be seen in a previous blog post.

We recently received the final map from the tracking of the Kittiwakes at Faraid Head. This map shows in high resolution all of the journeys from the nesting colony from the five birds tracked over just a few days. We found that there was huge variation in the distances travelled by these birds on a foraging trip; ranging from only a few miles, to over 200 miles in one journey. We also found that individual birds mostly followed similar routes each day.

These maps represent some of the best information currently available on marine areas used by seabirds during the breeding season, and the connectivity between marine areas usage and the location of breeding colonies. The area here represents only a small number of birds from the colony over a short period of time, so it is likely that the extent of the area accessed by the birds during the entire breeding season is much larger. This valuable information will be fed into the RSPB reports which will be used to help understand the needs of our wildlife and to shape conservation strategies protecting our seabirds for the future.

We are grateful to RSPB team, Stacey and Emily for sharing this data with us and look forward to welcoming Stacey as part of the Foxglove team for the summer when she starts later in the month.
 


(0) Comments:

There are no comments for this blog post yet. Why not start the discussion? - use the form below:


Leave a Comment:







Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

The following question is designed to make sure you are a real person and helps us cut down on spam.
Your comments will appear here once an administrator has reviewed them.

What is missing: North, South, East? (4 character(s) required)


Back to Top

Recent Blog Posts:

Spring Cleaning

Posted 19th June 2018

Today we've had help from our regular Tuesday Volunteers, pupils from the Dales School and our work experience student Josh with tidying up the paths…

Read More

Of Moles and Voles

Posted 18th June 2018

Foxglove seemed to be deserted when I  arrived just after 8.00 this morning, but then there was a tell-tale movement of grass in the opposite…

Read More

CES 5

Posted 17th June 2018

Bird ringers arrived for another 4am start.  In the distance a Tawny Owl called and then as dawn was breaking so the smaller birds started…

Read More

Wandering, Looking and Checking

Posted 16th June 2018

Dog Daisies are doing really well this year.  The end of the path behind the orchard on the way to the Dog Leg net ride…

Read More
 
 
 

Sitemap | Accessibility Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions |