Winter Species

Sunday, December 31st 2017

Entering the last few pieces of information into the Species Programme made me think back to what had been recorded during the year.  The species list now stands at 2681 species, with new species added again this year.  I wonder if there will ever be a year when we have none.  Doing this made me look back to what we can possibly find during the winter months.

Cones cover the upper bare branches of Larch trees.  These provide a vital food resource for many small birds which can often be seen flitting from branch to branch, calling quietly.  A pair of binoculars can be useful at this time of year.

Larch Cones

Privet, which grows by the side of the path leading to the middle moor gate, still has dark coloured berries holding fast to the branches.

Privet berries

Green leaves of Honeysuckle show through the vegetation.

Honeysuckle leaves

The reserve can look very dark with little colour as winter draws to a close but when you know where to look, a bright red splash of Scarlet Elfcup can be found.

Scarlet Elfcup

As February arrives we watch and listen for the Common Frogs to return to their spawning grounds.  Warm weather and they return early, cold weather means we have to be patient.

Common Frog and spawn

Later high pitched croaking, more like bird song, heralds the retun of the Common Toad to the ponds via the paths and Access Road.

Common Toad

Finally, if there has been some warmth in the sun, just before the spring equinox, the Opposite-golden Leaved Saxifrage opens its yellow flowers.

Opposite-golden Leaved Saxifrage

Many thanks to everyone who has contributed to Foxglove's 25 years, which we celebrated in July.  Much hard work has been carried out by many people over that time to make Foxglove the very special place that it is now.

Best wishes for a Happy, Peaceful and Healthy New Year.  Raise a dram to 2018.

Robert Burns expresses New Year in that time honoured song, Auld Lang Syne

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we’lltak' a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
and gie's a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak' a right gude-willie waught,
for auld lang syne.


(0) Comments:

There are no comments for this blog post yet. Why not start the discussion? - use the form below:


Leave a Comment:







Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

The following question is designed to make sure you are a real person and helps us cut down on spam.
Your comments will appear here once an administrator has reviewed them.

How many letters are in the word 'east' (1 character(s) required)


Back to Top

Recent Blog Posts:

News from the North and Foxglove Sightings

Posted 24th June 2018

Firstly more news from the North.  For several years the team have found a Barn Owl's nest on an island.  There have been eggs and…

Read More

Swallow Tales

Posted 23rd June 2018

At this time of year there are many summer wildlife visitors to the UK. Barn Swallows, Swifts, Sand Martins and House Martins all belong to…

Read More

Mole madness and other sightings

Posted 22nd June 2018

We've seen four Moles above ground today, most likely as a consequence of their invertebrate prey being scarce and/or the ground being particularly hard due…

Read More

Tidying the Green Route

Posted 21st June 2018

The group have achieved a great deal during our tidying of the Green Route today. We started the morning with boardwalk repairs and removing vegetation…

Read More
 
 
 

Sitemap | Accessibility Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions |