Many Hands Make Light Work

Thursday, August 31st 2017

It was another fine day at the reserve; only a minor shower that threatened more dampened the morn. With the fine weather we had a great team from Carillion Amey, the folk who keep a lot of things running smoothly on the camps. As we had our usual hard working volunteers on site we were able to divide and conquer a few jobs that needed a good few pairs of hands.

The Carillion team ventured to behind the tower hide, by the lake, to clear a section of undergrowth to enable us to use the area as a new net ride (number 66). First of all a few small silver birch saplings were cleared by Jonathan.

 Then the team entered the site to clear up and start popping small encroaching saplings that were taking over the area,

...plus the various brambles and other vegetation to enable a couple of poles and a mist net to function unheeded.This was not an easy area to get to and work in, but the team did a fantastic job which by tea break was completed ready for me to tidy up with a brush-ctter tomorrow. 

As we had finished a job that I had expected to take most of the morning we were then able to pick up a path maintenance job on the flower meadow/moorland. While some cleared grass to redefine the edging ….

…. the remaining repaired the rotten kick boards.

The end result was fantastic and we cannot thank the team enough. Incidentally I found out later that three of the Carillion team had attended having driven from Liverpool earlier that morning.

While the Carillion team were hard at work on one part of the reserve the Thursday volunteers were busy strimming the uncut areas on the flower meadow plus the unwanted Juncus grass and raking-up; can you spot Peter in the distance?

 ….fixing board walks


 

….servicing mowers

….and clearing away turf from the moorland path.

 This fresh Angle Shades moth was saved from our activities this afternoon; it is most likely a second generation.

We cannot express our gratitude enough for all the hard work and effort by all parties today…..thank you to Kevin Stewart for arranging and attending with the Carillion Amey team.
 


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Leap Into Nature!

Saturday 29th February 2020 | 10.30am start

Celebrate the Leap Year by learning about the hidden wildlife at the reserve. We will begin by identifying the moths in the moth trap (weather permitting) and then take a walk around the different habitats to see what is about. 

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