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Out and About

Friday, February 19th 2016

Visitors made the most of a sunny calm morning and many walked around the reserve and visited the Field Centre.  It was quieter in the afternoon as the weather deteriorated with strengthening wind and a persistent drizzle.  We should not complain too much as it is still officially winter!

A small team of bird ringers were in and the garden nets were raised.  Siskin are making their appearance and this male was showing off his beautiful plumage.

Male Siskin

Other birds processed included a Coal Tit that was ringed in a nest box in 2014, at Downholme, over 5km away.  Blue Tits, Great Tits and Lesser Redpoll were also included in the species list.  Many nests failed last year due to the weather and this is reflected in the birds that are passing through the ringing room.  The majority are adults having been born before 2015.  Very few young birds, hatched in 2015 are present in the birds processed.

Out for a walk, not really looking for a Primrose, but just happening to walk along paths where they might be, a reward, a yellow something and on closer inspection a Primrose! 

Primrose

Foxglove volunteers have a tremendous skill base and can turn their hands to most things.  Lesley and Elizabeth had minibeasts on their minds as they visited the outdoor classroom.  The area was examined and suggestions made as to how to enhance the area for minibeasts.  More child-friendly minibeast-friendly log piles were first on the list along with another 'fairy' ring of cut tree trunks (a friendly chainsaw person required for this task!) and the removal of Bramble and Rose.  This is just the start, watch this space.

Like bird ringing, moth trapping requires the 'correct' weather and over the last few months, strong winds, heavy rain and low temperatures have curtailed our mothing.  Very few moths have been spotted on the front of the Field Centre, a favourite place for them to rest.  There was one today, a Dotted Border.  These moths overwinter underground as pupa.  The larva can be found from April to June on a variety of broadleaved trees including Silver and Downy Birch, Goat and Grey Willow, Hawthorn and Field Maple, all of which can be found at Foxglove.

Dotted Border

Thank you to everyone who helped today.


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The Friends of Foxglove Covert is for those individuals, families and organisations who would like to support the reserve through an annual membership subscription. Friends receive a regular newsletter and invitations to attend our various activities and social events.

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December Winter Worky Day

Saturday 4th December 2021 | 10.00am - 3.00pm

Join our staff and volunteers for a fun day of practical habitat management tasks.  Specific tasks will be chosen nearer the time.  Come ready for all weather conditions and bring your oldest outdoor clothes as tasks will be mucky and may involve bonfires.

Booking is essential for this FREE event as a hot cooked lunch will be provided. 



January Winter Worky Day

Saturday 8th January 2022 | 10.00am - 3.00pm

Join our staff and volunteers for a fun day of practical habitat management tasks.  Specific tasks will be chosen nearer the time.  Come ready for all weather conditions and bring your oldest outdoor clothes as tasks will be mucky and may involve bonfires. 

Booking is essential for this FREE event as a hot cooked lunch will be provided. 



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