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Under the Boardwalk

Tuesday, October 27th 2015

A damp and misty start did not deter our band of willing volunteers, they eagerly set about continuing the task we started last week, clearing trees and shrubs adjacent to the boardwalk near the lake hide.  Last week the side abutting the small orchard area was cleared, this week it was the lake side.

It is much clearer now, letting light and air into the boardwalk which we hope will help it dry off after wet weather as it can become a little slippery underfoot when wet.  We selectively fell, leaving some of the older and larger trees nearer the waterline, these will act to screen the lake off just enough so that waterfowl are not frightened as people approach the hide to view them. 

There was of course our usual brash bonfire to give us all a rosy glow.

As is often the case in conservation management it is a balancing act, balancing the needs of wildlife with those of people.  We strive to get it right. Thank you to all those who came and helped today, as they say ‘many hands make light work’ and the difference you all make in just one day is truly amazing.
 


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